Friday December 9, 2022

An Independent Progressive Media Outlet

FacebookTwitterYoutube
Newsletter
News Feeds:
Evers Grants 56 Pardons, Brings Total Granted to 554 PDF Print E-mail
News
Written by GOV Press Wisconsin   
Friday, 10 June 2022 09:32

justice-statueA pardon is an official act of forgiveness that restores rights lost when someone is convicted of a felony, including the right to serve on a jury, hold public office, and hold certain professional licenses.


MADISON — Gov. Tony Evers announced today that he has granted another 56 pardons, bringing his total number of pardons granted to 554. The Governor’s Pardon Advisory Board heard from applicants virtually on April 8, 2022, and April 22, 2022, and applications that were selected for expedited review or recommended by the Board were forwarded to Gov. Evers for final consideration.

tony-evers“The folks receiving pardons today have worked hard to be contributing members of their communities and workplaces and to make amends for their past mistakes,” said Gov. Evers. “Every pardon is an official act of forgiveness that allows these individuals to continue their important work giving back to their communities and reach their full potential.”

Gov. Evers granted pardons to the following people:

  • Allen Berntgen more than two decades ago now failed to pull over for an officer while driving an ATV and fled. He now works as a truck driver and resides in Potosi with his family. The district attorney’s office supports his pardon.
  • Bennie Brown was caught selling a controlled substance from his apartment. He is now a grandfather who works at a VA Medical Center and resides in Oak Creek.
  • Victoria Brown was 19 when officers found a controlled substance in her residence. She now resides in Minnesota and recently obtained her associate degree in childcare and education.
  • Edward Bullock was 20 when he used stolen checks to make purchases at a sporting goods store and also robbed an individual selling speakers. Nearly three decades later, he now works as a mason in Milwaukee and serves as the vice president of his local union.
  • Erma Bush was almost 30 when, two decades ago, he sold a controlled substance to a confidential informant and failed to appear in court. He now resides in Milwaukee with his family and owns several businesses in music production and food.
  • Tyron Canady was 27 when he sold a controlled substance to an undercover officer. The district attorney’s office supports his pardon.
  • Brad Dormady was 21 when he was out on bond for possession of marijuana and entered a stranger’s residence without permission. He now resides in Weyauwega with his family and has since obtained his associate degree in renewable energy.
  • Vickie Drake was 18 three decades ago when she sold a controlled substance to a confidential informant. She now resides in Mount Horeb with her children and strives to help those who have experienced substance use disorders and domestic violence.
  • Mortez Evans was in his 30s when he failed to pay child support. He now resides in Milwaukee with his family and volunteers in his community. The court supports his pardon.
  • Kendra Ferguson was found to be in possession of marijuana and sold a controlled substance to an undercover officer. Nearly two decades later, she now resides in Milwaukee with her children and volunteers with her local church as a Sunday school teacher and choir director.
  • Katrina Gilbert was 18 when she sold a controlled substance to an undercover officer. Now a dedicated advocate, she resides in Milwaukee and works as an Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse (AODA) counselor and a crisis advocate for domestic abuse and sexual assault survivors.
  • Leonard Givens was 20 when police found marijuana in his vehicle. Now 25 years later, he remodels homes and volunteers in his community. The district attorney’s office supports his pardon.
  • Chad Gulseth was 29 when he sold marijuana to a confidential informant. Now 27 years later, he resides in Two Rivers with his family and owns his own landscaping business, participates in competitive community fishing teams, and mentors youth.
  • Sharonda Guthrie was 18 when, 24 years ago, officers found her in possession of a controlled substance. Guthrie has since obtained her associate degree in applied science, and now resides in Glendale with her children. The court supports her pardon.
  • Jeremy Hall was 20 when he sold marijuana to a confidential informant. Now 28 years later, he resides in Seattle, Washington, with his family and has built a successful career in the tech industry.
  • Ellis Hargrove was 36 when a police officer found him with marijuana in his possession. He now resides in Milwaukee with his child.
  • Jerry Henderson was 31 when officers found him in possession of a controlled substance. Now 25 years later, Henderson resides in Pleasant Prairie with his family and has worked with the same manufacturing company for 20 years. The court supports his pardon.
  • Taylor Herman was 41 when officers found him with a controlled substance over three decades ago. Herman has since earned his bachelor’s degree in criminal justice and master’s degree in education and had his artwork exhibited in Milwaukee and Chicago. He is now a great-grandfather and resides in Milwaukee with his family.
  • Veronda Jackson was 18 when, over two decades ago, she used someone else’s credit card information to make purchases at an electronics store. Currently pursuing a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice, she now resides in Milwaukee and works for a nonprofit that teaches trades skills to formerly incarcerated individuals. The district attorney’s office supports her pardon.
  • Jeremy Jaeger was 18 when he sold marijuana to a confidential informant. He now resides in Milwaukee with his family and has obtained his bachelor’s degree in business administration.
  • Dewayne Johnson was 24 when he sold a controlled substance to a confidential informant. He now resides in Madison with his family, working as a custodian.
  • LaQuita Johnson was 26 when officers found marijuana in her residence over three decades ago. She now resides in Racine and received her associate degree in early childhood education.
  • Max Kappus was 19 when officers found marijuana at his residence. He now resides in Eau Claire and has obtained two associate degrees: one in audio engineering and another in mechanical design. The court supports his pardon.
  • Nicosia King was 19 when she helped a friend cash stolen payroll checks. Now an entrepreneur, King has received recognition as a successful business owner and volunteer in her community from the city of Milwaukee, where she now resides.
  • Gloria Kirchoff was 33 when, 30 years ago, she sold a controlled substance to an undercover officer and, a year later, was caught in possession of a controlled substance. Now a grandmother, she resides in Madison, has obtained her associate degree, and has been a member of the Wisconsin Association of Black State Employees and the Wisconsin Women in Government Board. The court supports her pardon.
  • Andrew Krizan IV was 28 when he stole from his employer by falsifying cash refunds 24 years ago. Now a self-employed carpenter, Krizan resides in Pardeeville with his family and volunteers with veterans in his community.
  • Kevin Martin was 19 when officers found marijuana plants in his residence. Now 25 years later, Martin resides in Sheboygan and volunteers in his community.
  • Robert McPherson was 24 when, over three decades ago, he stole a car, drove it to Florida, and sold it without the owner’s permission. He now resides with his family, where he works as a laborer and lends his skills to help the elderly. The district attorney’s office supports his pardon.
  • Courtenay Miner was 20 when officers found him in possession of a controlled substance over two decades ago. Miner now resides in Milwaukee, where he volunteers in his child’s school.
  • Chad Minnier was 20 when he sold a controlled substance to a confidential informant. He now resides in Eden with his family, owns a towing company, and volunteers in his community.
  • James Nilles was 18 when officers found him in possession of marijuana in his residence. Now, nearly 24 years later, Nilles resides in Cross Plains with his family, where he has maintained steady employment for over two decades.
  • Paul Petit was 21 when he sold marijuana out of his apartment. Petit obtained an associate degree in marketing and now resides in Waunakee with his family.
  • Angela Rands was 31 when she issued worthless checks to support her family. She now resides in Chippewa Falls with her family and actively volunteers in her community.
  • Aaron Ries was 20 when he and several friends burglarized and damaged eight summer cottages. Two decades later, Ries now uses his carpentry skills working on a farm in Kiel, where he resides.
  • Jasson Roeglin was 19 when, 26 years ago, officers pulled him over and found marijuana in his vehicle. An avid outdoorsman, Roeglin now spends his time hiking, fishing, and kayaking with his family in Coos Bay, Oregon, where he resides and works as a hospital plant operations technician.
  • Joshua Rosenbalm was 18 when he sold a controlled substance to a confidential informant over two decades ago. He now resides in Milwaukee where he volunteers in his community and works in the restaurant and bar industry.
  • Thomas Ruetten was 21 when he sold marijuana to an undercover officer three times. Now 34 years later, Ruetten is a respected member of his community in Markesan, where he resides with his children and owns a floor coating business. The court supports his pardon.
  • Richard Schmidt was 40 and in financial trouble when he stole products from his employer. He now resides in McFarland with his family and volunteers with youth sports in his community.
  • Gary Shilts was 19 when he stole a county-owned vehicle with friends. Now over two decades later, he resides in Ladysmith with his family and has worked in the construction industry for over 20 years.
  • Vadim Srug was 24 when officers caught him in possession of marijuana. Srug now resides in Stoughton and his pardon will help him travel to Ukraine to visit his family.
  • Frank St. John was 26 when he and several friends stole auto parts from a salvage yard. Now 27 years later, he is a grandfather and resides in Oshkosh with his family. The district attorney’s office supports his pardon.
  • Derek Taycher was 18 when, nearly 30 years ago, he entered someone’s home, stole checks, and cashed them. Several years later, Taycher failed to pay child support and again stole others’ checks to cash. He now resides in Green Bay with his family and has been a carpenter for over 20 years.
  • Lucas Thienes was 17 when he and several friends broke into two homes, stealing jewelry and firearms from one and significantly vandalizing the other. Thienes now resides in La Crosse with his family. The victims support his pardon.
  • Karen Thomas was 19 when she stole someone’s purse and used their credit cards. Now 27 years later, Thomas resides in Milwaukee, earned her bachelor’s degree in human services, and has worked in the social service field as an AODA counselor, paraprofessional at Milwaukee Public Schools, and youth service counselor. The court supports her pardon.
  • Nicole Tingle was 21 when she and another individual fraudulently purchased and sold three motor vehicles. Almost two decades later, she earned her associate degree and bachelor’s degree in business management. Tingle now resides in Santee, California, with her family, where she owns two skincare businesses.
  • Paul Vance was 21 when, 25 years ago, he stole electronics from his employer with several coworkers. Vance now resides in Racine with his family and has worked as an emergency medical technician (EMT) for nearly 10 years.
  • Jim Vang was 21 when he and a friend stole from their employer. Now two decades later, Vang works for a pulp and paper manufacturer and resides in Appleton with family, where he is an active member of his church.
  • Dale Varney was 18 when he helped burglarize a home with several friends. Varney obtained his GED and a welding certificate while in prison. Now 25 years later, he resides in Two Rivers and works for a construction company.
  • Jonathan Verser previously failed to pay child support. He now resides in Georgia with his family and has spent most of his career working in social services and treatment centers.
  • Athelstran Wagner was 31 when the police were called to his residence and he refused to come out, leading to a stand-off with officers. Now a proud father and uncle, Wagner resides in Milwaukee and obtained a machine tools operations diploma.
  • Jennifer Westling was 19 when, 24 years ago, she and another individual entered several vehicles and garages, taking items of value. She now resides in Grandview with her children and serves as a caregiver to those with intellectual disabilities.
  • Theresa Williams was 26 when officers executed a search warrant on her residence and found controlled substances. Now 27 years later, she resides in Milwaukee and volunteers in her community through her church.
  • Johnny Willis was 22 when, 22 years ago, he failed to pullover for an officer, leading them on a high-speed chase. Now married with grandchildren, Willis resides in Trevor with his family and has worked as a heavy equipment operator for the last 20 years. Willis received robust community support for his pardon.
  • Trever Witt was 19 when, 21 years ago, he led police on a high-speed chase after failing to pull over. Witt now resides in Stanley with his family where he volunteers in his children’s sports.
  • James Wright was 19 when he operated a stolen car 22 years ago. Wright now works as a water meter investigator and actively volunteers in his community. The district attorney’s office supports his pardon.
  • Marito Yang was 19 when he attended a street race and fled the scene, failing to pull over for an officer. Yang obtained an associate degree in computer drafting and design and now resides in Green Bay with his family.

The Wisconsin Constitution grants the governor the power to pardon individuals convicted of a crime. A pardon is an official act of forgiveness that restores rights lost when someone is convicted of a felony, including the right to serve on a jury, hold public office, and hold certain professional licenses. A pardon does not expunge court records.

Under Executive Order #30, individuals convicted of a Wisconsin felony may apply for a pardon if they completed their sentence at least five years ago and have no pending criminal charges. Individuals currently required to register on the sex offender registry are ineligible for a pardon. Executive Order #130 established an expedited review process for applications that meet stricter criteria, including a greater length of time elapsed since sentence completion and nonviolent nature of the offenses.

The pardon application, instructions, and answers to frequently asked questions about the pardon process can be found on the governor’s website at www.evers.wi.gov/pardons.

The Governor’s Pardon Advisory Board meets twice a month. The next meeting will take place today, Fri., June 10, 2022. These hearings will air on wiseye.org/live and on YouTube from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

 
Tweet With Us:

Share

Copyright © 2022. Green Bay Progressive. Designed by Shape5.com