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Elections, Elected Officials and Political Parties
Senator Ron Johnson Defends his Support of Donald Trump PDF Print E-mail
Elections, Elected Officials, Political Parties
Written by Democratic Party of Wisconsin, Brandon Weathersby   
Monday, 04 April 2016 14:10

ron-johnsonMADISON - This past Sunday Senator Ron Johnson tried to explain away his deplorable support for the bombastic and offensive Republican Presidential front-runner Donald Trump. Trump has taken his party by storm, including the support of Ron Johnson, by pushing misogyny, racism, xenophobia, and making fun of physically disabled individuals.

donald-trumpIn addition, Ron Johnson continues to defend his partisan obstructionism of not allowing President Obama’s Supreme Court nominee, Merrick Garland, from having a hearing and a vote. Other Republicans are decrying these tactics as foolhardy and as serving no common good.

See excerpts from the article below.

After U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson told CNN that he thinks having Donald Trump at the top of the Republican ticket in November could help down-ticket GOP candidates, a number of outlets picked up on one quote:

"Stump with Trump?" he said last Monday in Waukesha when asked if he would campaign with the current GOP front-runner, according to CNN. "Just because it rhymes: It'd be the Ronald (and) the Donald,"CNN quoted Johnson, a Republican from Oshkosh.

Johnson, who's running for re-election against former Sen. Russ Feingold, was on NBC's "Meet the Press" on Sunday and tried to clear up that he hasn't endorsed any of the Republican candidates for president. Judging from the reaction, he may have made things less clear.

Host Chuck Todd called Johnson one of the few on the Republican side who've said that Trump being the GOP candidate would help in a re-election campaign.
"What I've been talking about is, from my standpoint, I'm a businessperson,"

Johnson said. "I'm a completely outsider. And that certainly is what has resonated about his campaign in many respects. But from my standpoint, I think what this campaign ought to be about is growth. How do you grow our economy? It's the No. 1 component for a solution.

[…]

In Sunday's "Meet the Press" interview, he reiterated that he thinks it's "problematic" to consider a new Supreme Court justice in a presidential election year.

"He appears to be pretty hostile to the Second Amendment right to keep and bear arms, which would not be popular in Wisconsin," Johnson said of Garland. "So I'm doing my job in protecting the Second Amendment rights of Wisconsinites by just withholding my consent."

Read the whole article here.

 
Ron Johnson SCOTUS Talking Points Come Straight From Right-Wing Groups PDF Print E-mail
Elections, Elected Officials, Political Parties
Written by People for the American Way   
Tuesday, 29 March 2016 15:09

merrick-garland-scotusMADISON - Sen. Ron Johnson of Wisconsin is one of the Republican senators who is under considerable pressure in his home state to break from his party leadership and consider the nomination of Judge Merrick Garland to the Supreme Court.

So far, Johnson has toed the party line and says that he supports blocking any nominee to the Supreme Court for the remainder of Obama’s presidency. In defending this position, he has turned to a number of stock talking points cooked up by right-wing groups seeking to keep an Obama nominee off the Supreme Court.

As soon as President Obama announced his nomination of Garland, Johnson turned to the talking point that the conservative Judicial Crisis Network has been promoting since soon after Justice Antonin Scalia’s death left a vacant seat on the Supreme Court.

ron-johnsonJohnson’s appeal to let the American people “decide” and give them a “voice” by discounting President Obama’s entire last year in office, comes straight out of the messaging that JCN started hammering in early ads urging obstruction. In JCN’s first ad, a narrator says:

It’s ‘We the People.’ Sometimes the politicians forget that. The Supreme Court has a vacancy and your vote in November is your only voice. Sen. Chuck Grassley agrees: the American people should decide. This isn’t about Republicans or Democrats. It’s about your voice. You choose the next president, the next president chooses the next justice. Call Sen. Chuck Grassley. Thank him for letting the people decide.

Of course, the people already did have a voice in choosing who would pick the next Supreme Court justice when they reelected President Obama for a second four-year term in 2012.

The New York Times reported yesterday on an event in Wisconsin at which Johnson attempted to justify the Senate GOP’s obstructionism by implying that the Constitution’s requirement of “advice and consent” can mean the Senate advising the president not to make any judicial nomination at all:

“Yeah, I am hearing the drumbeat, ‘Do your job! Do your job!’ ” Mr. Johnson said, invoking the Democrats’ battle cry in their quest to get Judge Garland a hearing. “We’re doing our job,” Mr. Johnson declared, to shouts of “yes.”

“Our job as a coequal branch in the nomination process is advise and consent,” he said. “Well, President Obama — surprise — didn’t heed our advice. So now we are doing the second part of that advice and consent: We’re withholding our consent. Completely appropriate.”

This is a talking point that Jay Sekulow of the American Center for Law and Justice, a longtime right-wing player in judicial fights, pioneered very soon after the death of Justice Scalia, when he told televangelist Pat Robertson, “The Senate has a role in this, the Constitution says ‘advice and consent.’ The advice here is, ‘Don’t put up a nominee when you’re only going to be the president, you’re a lame duck and you’re only going to be the president for 11 months.’”

We don’t think that refusing to even consider a Supreme Court nominee is what the founders had in mind when they gave the Senate the power of “advice and consent," which is why the GOP leadership’s decision to have the Senate do absolutely nothing in response to a Supreme Court nomination is unprecedented.

According to the Times article, Johnson has also taken to saying that Garland is “hostile” to the Second Amendment:

“Judge Merrick is hostile to your Second Amendment right to keep and bear arms,” Mr. Johnson said in Pewaukee, using the judge’s first name. “So I am doing my job to protect the Second Amendment rights of Wisconsinites.”

Johnson’s use of the word “hostile” is no accident. The phrase “hostile to the Second Amendment” is what right-wing groups have settled on to describe Garland’s utterly benign record on gun rights. That’s the exact phrase that the National Rifle Association has been using in its effort to stir up opposition to Garland’s nomination. The “hostile” term seems to have come from an opposition research package put together by the Judicial Crisis Network, which in turn seems to have borrowed the phrase from a 2007 article in the NRA’s magazine.

We outlined last week why the Second Amendment “hostility” argument is bunk.

Senate Republicans seem to have ceded not only their governing, but the very words that come out of their mouths, to right-wing obstructionist groups.

 
Gov. Scott Walker Endorses Sen. Ted Cruz PDF Print E-mail
Elections, Elected Officials, Political Parties
Written by Democratic Party of Wisconsin, Brandon Weathersby   
Tuesday, 29 March 2016 13:31

scott-walkerMADISON – Governor Scott Walker endorsed Senator Ted Cruz today to be the next President of the United States, throwing his support behind a candidate who shares many of his extreme right-wing policies.  Throughout his tenure, Cruz has compared the fight to defund Obamacare to that of fighting Nazis in World War II, referred to marriage equality as the “radical gay marriage agenda”, and said those who believe in climate change are equivalent to people who believe the earth is flat.

Ted CruzCruz’s extreme record mirrors not only that of Walker, but also of current GOP frontrunner Donald Trump. Most recently, Cruz said we should “patrol and secure Muslim neighborhoods”, but this only scratches the surface of his divisive rhetoric. Cruz has accused people who support marriage equality as waging “jihad” against people of faith, said the laws in this country that give women a right to choose are extreme, and has said the Obama economy is disastrous even though we have had 68 positive months of job growth.

“It’s shameful that Scott Walker would support a candidate with an extreme record of divisive policies and hateful partisan rhetoric,” Democratic Party of Wisconsin Executive Director Kory Kozloski said on Tuesday. “Ted Cruz has spent his career working to divide people across this nation, rather than working to bring us together. That is not the sort of candidate the Governor of our state should be standing behind.” Kozloski said.

Below is a brief history of Ted Cruz’s divisive rhetoric.   Climate Change

ACA

Gay Marriage and Homophobia

A Bit More

 
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