Monday January 22, 2018

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Lt. Governor Barbara Lawton Endorses Tim Burns for the Wisconsin Supreme Court PDF Print E-mail
Elections, Elected Officials, Political Parties
Written by Burns for Wisconsin, Amanda Brink   
Thursday, 18 January 2018 12:15

tim-burnsMADISON, WI - Lt. Governor Barbara Lawton has endorsed Tim Burns for the Wisconsin Supreme Court. Elected in 2002, Lawton was the first woman to serve as Wisconsin’s Lieutenant Governor.

The following is a statement from Lt. Governor Barbara Lawton:

barbara-lawton“Tim Burns brings his intellectual muscle and deep experience as an attorney, his clearly articulated progressive values, and his deep respect for the law to this campaign to bring change to our tragically broken Wisconsin Supreme Court. He has a vision for justice and a powerful drive to serve; what luck for Wisconsin!”

###

Tim Burns is a partner at a law firm in Madison. Burns is running for the seat now held by Justice Michael Gableman, who has announced his retirement from the court. The primary will be held on February 20th, 2018 and will narrow the field to 2 candidates who will advance to the April 3rd general election.

Tim is a former co-chair of the Insurance Coverage Litigation Committee of the American Bar Association. A graduate of University of Missouri-Columbia Law School, Tim is licensed in Wisconsin, Illinois and Missouri. Tim's national practice focuses on making insurance companies live up to their obligations to their policyholders. Tim also serves on the national board of the American Constitution Society and he chaired the Fair and Impartial Courts Committee of the Civil Rights and Social Justice Section of the American Bar Association.

Tim and his wife Pam, have chosen Middleton to raise their family. Married for over 20 years, they have three children.

 
Principle Over Party Campaign Breaks 6 Figures Relying on Small Donations PDF Print E-mail
Elections, Elected Officials, Political Parties
Written by Commoners for Mike McCabe, Christine Welcher   
Thursday, 18 January 2018 12:01

mccabe-govCandidate for Governor Mike McCabe is not accepting any single donation over $200 from supporters. Policy mirrors the values McCabe promoted for decades as an independent watchdog and reform advocate.


ALTOONA, WI - Mike McCabe’s Principle Over Party campaign for governor launched on September 12 and reported Tuesday bringing in over $104,000 by the end of 2017 even though McCabe is not accepting any single donation over $200 from supporters while state law allows candidates for governor in Wisconsin to take as much as $20,000 from individuals and $86,000 from political action committees.

“We have a plan to win and we will have the resources we need to carry out that plan,” McCabe said.

The Commoners for Mike McCabe committee’s year-end report to state election authorities lists 1102 contributions from 719 individuals. Supporters are allowed to give more than once but not more than $200 at a time and no more than a total of $1,000 for the entire campaign.

mike-mccabe“We’re grateful for the outpouring of support we’ve received from all across the state, but a campaign finance report does not reflect or measure the greatest strength of our campaign – the extensive grassroots volunteer activity, neighbor-to-neighbor contact and direct voter outreach by the campaign,” McCabe said.

By the year’s end, the Principle Over Party campaign had already logged more than 37,000 miles just since McCabe made his candidacy official on September 12, traversing Wisconsin many times reaching out to voters in every part of the state. More than 130 stops were made along the way, including over 80 events that were open to the public and media. The campaign also held close to 60 neighborhood organizing meetings and volunteer trainings in communities across the state, and have dozens more lined up in coming weeks.

“These days candidates for office are told they have no choice but to spend four or five hours a day every single day raising money. We’re spending 10, 12, 14 hours a day raising a citizen army,” McCabe said. “Our campaign is a 21st Century version of how Bill Proxmire won statewide elections in Wisconsin for 30 years. Barnstorming the state. Pounding the pavement. Neighbors talking to neighbors.”

The way the Principle Over Party campaign is funded mirrors the values McCabe promoted for decades as an independent watchdog and reform advocate. In the mid-1990s, he helped start the Wisconsin Democracy Campaign, a nonpartisan group that focuses on exposing the influence of big money in state government and works to make people matter more than money in politics. He led the group for 15 years as its director. He left the Democracy Campaign at the end of 2014 to start Blue Jean Nation, a grassroots citizens group working to organize people locally to challenge the political establishment to change its ways.

“The governor won’t be beaten with money. He’ll have way more than anyone,” McCabe said, noting that Democrats spent $33 million in 2014, $22 million in 2012 and $12 million in 2010 in hopes of defeating Scott Walker only to see Republican forces vastly outspend them and Walker win by virtually identical margins in the three elections. “What he’s never faced is a genuinely people-powered grassroots crusade that creates a vivid contrast between the governor’s campaign bankrolled by billionaire tycoons and one that is truly of, by and for the people. For three elections now, Democrats have looked for a Goliath, but their Goliath has been beaten to a pulp by the far-larger Republican Goliath. Remember, it was David who defeated Goliath. It was David who brought down the giant.”

McCabe added: “For Wisconsin to become what it has the potential to be, the death grip of big money influence has to be broken and our state government must be freed from the clutches of cronyism, corruption and what amounts to legal bribery of state officials.”

In its report of campaign activity through the end of 2017, Commoners for Mike McCabe reported fundraising totaling $104,493.91 and expenses totaling $83,336.64 with an ending balance of $21,157.27. Loans from the candidate and his wife totaling $25,000 to provided the campaign with start-up funding. The rest of the money raised came from individual contributions averaging $72.

 
New Poll Shows Evers With Massive Lead PDF Print E-mail
Elections, Elected Officials, Political Parties
Written by Tony Evers for Governor, Maggie Gau   
Friday, 12 January 2018 15:34

tony_eversMADISON – The first publicly-released survey of the Democratic primary for Governor of Wisconsin shows State Superintendent Tony Evers with a massive 18-point lead over the rest of the primary field.

Democratic Primary Vote

Tony Evers

29%

Kathleen Vinehout

11%

Paul Soglin

10%

Matt Flynn

5%

Mahlon Mitchell

5%

Mike McCabe

5%

Dana Wachs

4%

Andy Gronik

2%

Kelda Roys

2%

Undecided

28%

In a 9-person field of candidates, Evers garners 29% of the vote, while only two other candidates, Kathleen Vinehout (11%) and Paul Soglin (10%) attract double-digit support. Evers leads by double-digits in every major media market, including a 12-point lead over Paul Soglin in the Madison market. In addition to winning 34% of the vote in Madison, Evers is supported by 25% of primary voters in the Milwaukee market (leading Flynn by 19 points and Gronik by 22 points), 32% in the Wausau/Eau Claire/La Crosse markets (leading Vinehout by 17 and Wachs by 26 points), and 33% in the Green Bay market.

 

After voters are read a short description of all 9 candidates, Evers’ lead increases from 18 to 21 points.

 

Months of negative attacks by Walker have done little to dent Evers’ image.  His strength is reflected in his overwhelmingly favorable image among primary voters, among whom 60% view him favorably and only 9% view him unfavorably.  Other candidates tested were far less known and far less liked than Evers.

“This poll confirms what we’ve been hearing around the state – Democratic primary voters know that Tony Evers’ record of standing up to Scott Walker to defend our public schools, fighting against Walker’s $4,000,000,000 Foxconn deal and his proven ability to win statewide elections make him the best choice to fix the state after 8 years of Walker mismanagement,” said campaign manager Nathan Henry.

Candidate Most Likely To Beat   Scott Walker

Tony Evers

35%

Paul Soglin

10%

Kathleen Vinehout

7%

Matt Flynn

7%

Mike McCabe

6%

Mahlon Mitchell

3%

Andy Gronik

2%

Kelda Roys

2%

Dana Wachs

2%

Undecided

26%

 

Evers is easily seen as the candidate most likely to beat Scott Walker in November.  When voters were asked, “Regardless of who you might vote for, working from the same list of choices, which candidate do you think has the best chance of beating Scott Walker in November,” 35% chose Evers – 25 points higher than Soglin (10%), with no other candidate exceeding single digits.

 

“In order to beat Scott Walker in November, Democrats must field the strongest candidate possible,” Henry said.  “By a significant margin, Democratic primary voters believe Tony and his record of achievement for Wisconsin make him the candidate with the best chance of defeating Walker.”

 

The survey of 747 likely Democratic primary voters was conducted by Public Policy Polling from January 8-10, 2018.  The survey was called using IVR technology.  The margin of error is +/- 3.6%.  Full details of the poll can be found on the poll memo accompanying this release.

 
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